Letting In

Letting go is widely spoken of –there are books, movies, speeches, music, and experiences (I have, like most others, touched upon it as well: Learn to Let Go). It is an important part of life and the relationships that we build with others. The process is painful, bittersweet, and at the end of the day, extremely liberating.

Lately, however, I have been thinking about how beautiful, bittersweet, and tumultuous, letting in can be.

Here you are, enclosed in your space, with walls that you have built with bricks made of your fears. You exist within the walls to guard yourself against the pain that eventual letting go brings –to avoid the letting go, we build a wall that keeps us from letting in. It is our own safe space that is set to our comforts, expectations, and intensity. It is a space that has no surprises –everything is, at least on the face of it, under control.

People, however, are like rays of the sun; they creep in through cracks before we know it. It doesn’t take much, either. All it often takes is a smile, a gesture, or some kindness. Before you know it, your wall is cracked, your fears are realised, and your life spins out of the false sense of control that you had instilled.

As far as I am concerned, I resist. I frantically run around, trying to place the bricks back into their places. I try mending those cracks by pushing people away or shutting myself further. I run, I scream, and just throw my arms up in frustration. It is, after all, quite frustrating –letting in is not easy.

It is also often inevitable, this letting in. Some people just make it through before you know it. You stop resisting after a point –you fall into routines. There are patterns, jokes, secrets, and unloading of baggage. Nights are painted with secrets and days brim of laughter.

When we let someone in, it reflects in our lives. We have new ideas and new thoughts. We are exposed to new versions and a new world. We pick up their words, their styles, their thoughts. We find new things to laugh about, new stories to ponder upon. There is new music, new movies, and new books. There are new places and fresh experiences. There is shyness, comfort, and gradual treading. There is fear, insecurity, and curiosity, all laced with a weird sense of happiness. There is the birth of something new –something that has not existed before. You discover a new part of yourself.

This doesn’t really have to be romantic either. This is simply what letting in feels like –it is a new day, each filled with adventure, new thoughts, and immense self-growth.

It is not easy to do, not at all. It is also, for most bit, inevitable that at some point this letting in will transform into letting go. Change, after all, will always be the course of nature. What is important, however, is to wake up each day with a smile to remind yourself that at this very moment, something amazing is happening to you. Remember that you are creating new memories, new stories, and for all you know, new relationships.

Sure, it might hurt later –when you hear those songs again, or those jokes, or references, or perhaps simply their name. There may be triggers, tears, and something inside you may break. There is a risk, there always is.

What should keep you going, nevertheless, is that all of this adds up to what life really is. Each experience, each letting in, and each letting go, eventually becomes a part of the big book called Life. When you are older and in a different phase, you are going to look back at these little moments and know that these are what made you who you are.

Whoever we let in, big or small, influential or not, romantic or platonic, they change us. They become a part of us. Wherever you go after that –whether together or apart –you will carry a piece of them with you. They will be a part of you and you, of them.

To think of it, maybe letting in isn’t so bad.

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Learn to Let Go

We highly underestimate the power of letting go.
To let go is an important part of life, for change is eternal and constant.
We often find ourselves attached unhealthily to a goal, a person, an expectation, or a relationship. We fail to realise that if we do not learn to let go, it will bear disastrous consequences to not only our peace of mind but also our emotional, mental and more often than not, physical, well-being.
Through this write up I wish to explore, understand and evaluate the nature of attachment we develop towards our significant other.
Not all relationships are healthy and positive; some of them are highly negative and toxic.
“I don’t know, Mitali,” said a friend to me a while ago, “He seems so indifferent.” When I asked her to let go, all she said was, “But he loves me.”
Her voice echoed conviction. I think she was trying to convince herself.
The divides and distances in any relationship do not emerge overnight; they slip in slowly, ever so slowly, until you wake up one day realising how things are not the way they were before.
They never slip unnoticed either; somewhere, deep down, we are always aware of the cracks that are entering a relationship, we just tend to ignore them, because the dawn of realisation is one filled with inconsolable pain.
But at the end of the day, no matter how strong you’ve been, or how long you’ve been together, or how fresh or mend-able the cracks are, when a relationship hurts you, when it gives you more negative energy and tears than happiness and positive vibes, it is time for introspection.
A relationship is supposed to make you happy, independent, and satisfied. It must stabilise your life. Why would you want to be with someone who makes you cry, just because you’re comfortable with them?
Nothing ever grows in a comfort zone.
Growth is painful, change is painful. But nothing is more painful than being somewhere where you don’t belong.
It is foolish to believe that the other person cannot fall out of love with you -of course, they can, without any pretext and as easily as they fell for you.
This is not because they didn’t love you, they may have been crazy about you genuinely, but then, not all things last.
It is imperative to accept that people change; sometimes when people grow, they grow apart.
Of course, it is worthwhile to try and fix broken relationships, but that does not mean one should not be ready with arms and ammunition; because hoping for the best does not mean you shouldn’t prepare for the worst.
Letting go is never easy, it is always a mammoth and often a messy task.
And of course we all hate to admit it, but it is indeed a wise task.